First XC From the Forgotten Site

After watching everyone else fly xc after xc whilst I was busy at work I finally caved in and booked a last minute day off. Conditions were forecast to be ok for xc flying but not too epic locally. I briefly flirted with the idea of driving to the Malverns but it would have been a very long and expensive drive on my own. I decided to head to Chalton, our rarely used local easterly site.

Chalton is smaller than Mercury or Whitewool and has a lot of trees on the slope. It did have a lot of thorny bushes covering the top and slope but a scrub bash a few years ago cleared a lot and the farmer topped the hill at the beginning of the year. It is still not as friendly as the other two sites but it is greatly improved from the past. Another improvement we have made is to the parking arrangements. The site guide has previously recommended parking in a layby at the bottom of the hill and walking up, quite an unpleasant walk! We have found it easier to park next to the pub and walk through the churchyard and across the top of the hill to launch. This has the added advantage of every flying day ending at the pub.

I arrived at the hill alone at about 1030, usually I don’t like flying alone but it is a common occurrence at Chalton. As I got my kit ready I could already feel thermal cycles coming through and a few cumulus forming in the distance. I took off and immediately found the air to be quite rough with the thermals very sharp edged. A symptom of higher pressure more stable air.

I found some good thermals in amount the chop and a couple of times found myself 700ft above take off and dreaming of leaving the hill. Everytime the thermal bubble would fizzle out and I would drift back down to the ridge. I spent a lot of time scratching the trees for lift and even caught a full frontal on the brakes just as the leading edged started to give way (not pleasant when flying at treetop height). The scratchy conditions meant that I had made the walk up from the bottom of the hill several times by the time RJ turned up at 1230.

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Conditions continued to tease the both of us for another hour before I found a more solid thermal over the road to the north of take off. As I became to circle up I saw RJ screaming across the ridge on full bar to join me.

RJ caught me up as I hit a max altitude of 3000ft asl in a blue sky. The drift was to the south west so we decided to head for the coast rather than our previous goal of Whitewool. With weak thermals and a blue sky I decided to take it slow and milk the lift as RJ steamed off in search of something better. Unluckily he found nothing and landed near Denmead for 11.5km.

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I took a more southerly track staying over urban areas and managed to find another climb with took me to the high point of the flight, 3428ft. I glided for the clouds to the south of me and arrived above them!

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The wind was pushing me towards the radar on Portsdown Hill and I didn’t fancy having my nads fried so I crosswind towards Portsmouth. I didn’t have enough height to cross the built up area safely so I elected to land on Portsdown Hill safely away from the radar! I made 14.5km in the end, setting the Chalton XC record by default as no one had been xc from the site before! I think with a proper easterly or even ese wind and good xc conditions it should be possible to push north around Southampton airspace and onwards to proper distance.

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Whitesheet Paragliding Record

New PB, wahoo! Not the easiest flight, had to work hard to avoid the airspace in the strong wind. Got decked after all that hard work chasing a sailplane, what a plonker. Worked out as 74km, if I can make it to my house next time it will be 100km 🙂

http://www.xcontest.org/2013/world/en/flights/detail:dukeofted/10.8.2013/12:39

New Site Record!!!

Whitesheet – 10th August 2013

The forecast wasn’t great but suggested westerly with a slim chance of xc so I dragged a few fellow Skysurfers along to White/Brown Sheet for a crack. I sent my wind dummies up who confirmed that yes it was a brown day so I decided to see if it calmed down whilst I ate my lunch. By about oneish we had convinced ourselves that the gusts were more sensible and the sky now had a bit of blue in it. Nick Warren and I took off and after a couple of beats of a good kicking we appeared to be going up. Rough and small it was but we both circled each other and hung on for dear life.

We both arrived at cloudbase (Nick for the first time) and I set off for the next cloud with Nick at my side. The cloud produced a broken climb that was a challenging battle of up and down. I was slowly building height but Nick had had enough and flew on. He found something better that got him back up to my height and we both headed onwards. The sink was very bad so when I found some zeroes I hung on for dear life. At this point Nick pushed on and eventually landed for around 15k on his very first xc, bloody excellent in these conditions!

I was spinning around on my own at around 3000ft passing to the south of Salisbury when I spied a building cloud and made a fast glide thought the sink. It was text book stuff and got me back at base. The next couple of thermals zoomed but I was getting pushed towards Southampton airspace.

I didn’t think I would get anywhere near this far so I hadn’t been making an effort to clear it early. I took a thermal right to the edge of the airspace (LK8000 on the gps I bought off of Ruth was excellent for this) and then pushed north and up wind towards the nearest cloud. I found a nice strong but rough climb, well it found me! I was pulled in so hard I had to bury the brakes to stop the surge and then it was straight back into the roundy roundy until the airspace got in the way again.

I was making progress north and eventually squeaked round the airspace to the A303/M3 junction. On the home straight now I had two choices, a fairly close cloud over Popham airfield to the north or a cloud with a sailplane climbing under it further away but directly downwind.

Not wanting to risk getting low over a really busy Popham I headed off to chase after the sailplane. The vario started playing its sad song so I got on bar to clear the sink as quick as possible. Unfortunately it didn’t end until the ground got in the way. I tried for a valiant low save over a tractor but the wind was ripping the thermals to shreds. I spied a nice green lawn next to a massive manor house but thought better of it and picked a recently cut field and put down for a no step landing.

I was collected by a friendly farmer who dropped me at the entrance to the farm (probably just wanted me off of the farm) with instructions that Basingstoke was 8 miles north and Alresford was 8 miles south with no mobile reception and not a lot in between! Apparently I had landed on Preston Farm, owned by Lord Sainsburys!

After a couple of miles of walking down a national speed limit road with no path I decided to knock on a door and a kind couple let me use their house phone to call Nick for retrieve. A few hiccups and a couple of calls from a phone box and he eventually found me! Ended up being 74km which is my personal best and a new Whitesheet record. I still can’t believe it really happened, feels like someone else was flying.

Tracklog http://www.xcleague.com/xc/flights/20132566.html?vx=28

This one can display the airspace so you can see where I got stuck http://www.xcontest.org/world/en/flights/detail:dukeofted/10.8.2013/12:39

Richard

An Amazing Flight Over the Brecon Beacons

Round one of the BCC (British Clubs Challenge) at Nant y Moel on 20th April 2013. We were moved from Talybont due to stronger than forecast winds and arrived at Nant y Moel to find a great looking sky. It didn’t last too long and the clouds spread out covering much of the ground in shadow. Initially hard work to stay up and difficult to get to base, conditions picked up over the Brecon Beacons and I was at base and cruising. A mistake with my GPS (map was zoomed out!) meant I turned to avoid a danger zone way too early and flew into the leaside of Pen y Fan. The bad sink caused me to deck on the outskirts of Brecon just as a couple of pilots were climbing out over the town. One of them, Alistair Andrews went on to fly 130km!

Still, at 37.7km it is my best UK flight to date, and what amazing scenery to fly over!

Tracklog is at xcleague.com/xc/flights/2013667.html?vx=28
Photos – plus.google.com/u/0/photos/110064813345877055043/albums/5873525551212576097

Richard

Mere Bash 2012

Whoever ordered the flyable weather over the Mere Bash, bravo! The forecast was for very light winds and not very thermic either. I would never have bother driving all this way on that forecast but Alasdair convinced me to turn up to the bash a bit early on the off chance of a bit of flying. Coming off of the A303 I could already see gliders in the air, funny how you suddenly start driving much faster once you see gliders up! Turns out it was actually quite thermic but with a low inversion. For about an hour or so the thermals were kicking off of the field out front nicely and it was easy to get 1000ft above take off. Mostly nice and smooth too and with no chance of going xc you could just waft around enjoying the view. After a while the clouds came over and everyone floated back down to earth. It remained flyable but scratchy, a bit busy for my liking so I landed for a chinwag. It remained flyable until sun down, with everyone getting their fill of airtime.

With that, everyone set up tents in the landing field and gravitated towards the BBQ’s. After that we moved on the marquee for some excellent music from Leatherat and Also Eden. Combined with cheap local Ale and Cider and a jolly good night was had.

It was even flyable on Sunday morning… if you didn’t have a hang over.

The rest of the photos can be found here.

Paragliding Vol Biv in India – Bir Billing to Camp 360

About time I posted something about my trip to India. I was prompted to pull my finger out by Neil McCain, the Wessex Hang Gliding and Paragliding Club’s social secretary. He asked if I would do a talk about flying in India. Now, Will Palmer has already talked about his amazing adventure in the Himalayas so I decided to talk about how non skygods could fly in these amazing mountains. I edited together a video showing a short vol biv flight from Bir Billing to Camp 360 (and back!). This is a relatively straight forward 20km flight east from Billing launch, made more difficult by a low inversion and trying to keep 4 pilots together in the mountains! Have a quick look at the video, I will post a write up and some photos later.  Pilots were me on a Gin Sprint, Alasdair Jones on a Gradient Montana, Neil Withers on a Swing Arcus 5, and Remi Pickett on an Ozone Delta.